King Arthur Flour’s Extra-tangy Sourdough Bread

November 17, 2012 · 0 comments Print This Post

King Arthur Flour's Extra-tangy Sourdough Bread

King Arthur Flour’s Extra-tangy Sourdough Bread

If you read the post I did last year on sourdough bread, and thought it was good, wait until you try this sourdough recipe!

Think sourdough bread, but with an amp’d up sourdough taste.  If you can imagine the best sourdough bread you’ve ever had, this is better.  Yeah, it’s that good.

There’s no yeast added to the dough.  All of the leavening comes from within the sourdough starter.

Downside to no added yeast is that it takes a lot longer for the loaves to rise, but the taste is worth it.  Make sure you plan accordingly to allow for the extra long rising time (I usually make this on a weekend).

Extra-Tangy Sourdough Bread

1 cup “fed” sourdough starter
1 1/2 cups to 1 2/3 cups lukewarm water, enough to make a smooth dough
5 cups flour
1 tbsp sugar
2 1/4 tsp salt

  • Combine the starter, water, and 3 cups of the flour. Beat vigorously for 1 minute.
  • Cover, and let rest at room temperature for 4 hours. Refrigerate overnight, for about 12 hours.
  • Add the remaining ingredients: 2 cups of flour, sugar, and salt. Knead to form a smooth dough.
  • Allow the dough to rise in a covered bowl until it’s relaxed, smoothed out, and risen. Depending on the vigor of your starter, it may become REALLY puffy or it may just rise a bit. This can take anywhere from 2 to 5 hours. Understand this: sourdough bread (especially sourdough without added yeast) is as much art as science; everyone’s timetable will be different. So please allow yourself to go with the flow, and not treat this as an exact, to-the-minute process.
  • Gently divide the dough in half.
  • Gently shape the dough into two oval loaves, and place them on a lightly greased or parchment-lined baking sheet. Cover and let rise until very puffy, about 2 to 4 hours. Don’t worry if the loaves spread more than they rise; they’ll pick up once they hit the oven’s heat. Towards the end of the rising time, preheat the oven to 425°.
  • Spray the loaves with lukewarm water.
  • Make two fairly deep horizontal slashes in each; a serrated bread knife, wielded firmly, works well here.
  • Bake the bread for 25 to 30 minutes, until it’s a very deep golden brown. Remove it from the oven, and cool on a rack.

Notes:

  • As you can see from the rising time it’ll be anywhere from 20-27 hours after you start making this before it will go into the oven.  Plan accordingly.

Source: King Arthur Flour

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